October 10, 2017

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Catch it at the Comic Shop October 11th, 2017

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to three single issues and one trade for your consideration, with a little bit about why we like it.

James' picks:



Retcon #2 by Matt Nixon and Toby Cypress, published by Image Comics.
Real-life genies and mystical creatures?  Military forces working to capture and/or use magic and monsters? Possible rewriting of reality?  I'm here for all of this. Issue 1 was a great read, with incredible art from Toby Cypress, whose psychedelic style really works well with the subject matter. I'm excited for this one.


Dark Nights: Metal #3 by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, published by DC Comics.
This is a bonkers, weird book and it's been a lot of fun to see Scott Snyder channel Grant Morrison. I love Capullo's art here, and I love that this series has this sort of crazy feel where anything can happen. That's a little rare in comics these days. It's a very fun book.


Star Trek The Next Generation: Mirror Broken #4 by Scott Tipton, David Tipton and J.K. Woodward, published by IDW Publishing.
I just love the "evil mirror versions of people" stories in Star Trek It's just so much fun to see evil versions of your favorite characters running around and doing terrible things; the best of these stories still retain some core quality of those characters even when it's the dark mirror version of them. This has been a really enjoyable read so far and I'm curious to see where it goes.






The Dying and he Dead #6 by Jonathan Hickman, Ryan Bodenheim and Michael Garland, published by Image Comics.
Full disclosure, I'll read anything Jonathan Hickman writes. He's got stories that are big and intricate and reward repeat readings. Here he's working with one of my favorite artists in Ryan Bodenheim, who's detailed art style works great with the action and military violence and the totally out-there sci-fi elements in the story.  Michael Garland provides atmospheric colors with a limited color palate, that sets the mood perfectly. This is a big, exciting, heroic read.
  
Rob's Picks


Adventure Time Spooktacular 2017 by Various Writers and Authors. Published by Boom! Studios.
I don't know any of the members of the creative teams this year, but it's always fun to see different people play in the Adventure Time sandbox, and when you add Halloween into the mix, it makes it just that much more fun. I don't keep up with the comic adventures the way I did when Ryan North was at the helm, but I still like the comics I've read a lot, and I expect this one to be another treat.




Crime Destroyer #2, by Josh Bayer, Benjamin Marra, and others, Published by Fantagraphics.
The superheroes via Josh Bayer's thoroughly raw comics brain continues with this second issue of Crime Destroyer. Fearlessly taking on tropes from the comics Josh (and may of us around his age) grew up with, Bayer shows you can make comics in the Mighty Marvel Manner that are interesting, take chances, and aren't funding fascists.



Jack Kirby's Demon TP, published by DC Comics.

I don't know quite how anyone
Wouldn't have this book of fun
Filled with art only a King could provide.
If you don't have this yet
I think it's a safe bet
On its purchase you should decide!

[You can't fire me Scott, I created the site!]

Mike's Picks:



Mech Cadet Yu # 3 by Greg Pak and Takeshi Miyazawa, published by Boom! Studios.
This series toes that infinitely fine line between originality and homage. Pak and Miyazama are crafting their own original tale as much as they are writing a love letter to 80s mecha manga and anime – Gundam, Transformers, Voltron, and of course Robotech/Macross. It’s the undertone of reverence that allows the storytelling to flourish.


Mister Miracle # 3 by Tom King and Mitch Gerads, published by DC Comics.
It’s hard to tell with this series if the narrative is grand or minute. King seems to be out Morrisoning Morrison on this series, providing a trippy take that makes you wonder about long term continuity impacts. The tone and style of this book are reminiscent of 80s/90s Vertigo and proto-Vertigo superhero deconstructions.



Dan Dare # 1 by Peter Milligan, Alberto Fouche, and Christian Ward, published by Titan Publishing Group.
Titan is an interesting publisher. This week, they launch series for Dan Dare and The Fighting American, publish graphic novels starring Mike Hammer and Shelock Holmes, and continue series for Penny Dreadful and Wolfenstein. Not to mention, they also publish NCIS and Blacklist paperback novels. Dan Dare is an iconic, if somewhat dated British comics icon. I’d like to see what Milligan and company can do with him.


Terminator: The Original Comics Series – Tempest and One Shot by John Arcudi, James Robinson, Paul Guin, Chris Warner, Matt Wagner, Chris Chalenor, and Rachell Meshe, published by Dark Horse Comics.


Harken back to the glory days of Dark Horse’s licensed properties with the original Terminator series. I’m a mark for all things Terminator, and the franchise has waxed and waned with its commitment to an expanded universe, though the early work found in this collection provides some of the best examples.