November 30, 2021

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Happy Hanukkah! We got you some comics: Catch It December 1st, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

James' Picks:


Wonder Woman Historia #1 by Kelly Sue DeConnick, Phil Jimenez, Hi-Fi, Romulo Fajardo, Jr., and Arif Prianto, published by DC Comics

I don't know much of anything about this series, but what I've seen looks exceptionally beautiful. Like, absolutely stunning. Phil Jimenez is a wonderful artist who (I think) hasn't done as much sequential comic work in recent years. Or, at least, I haven't read a comic drawn by him in a while. Well, I think everyone is in for a treat. He's an exceptional artist, and Kelly Sue DeConnick is an exceptional writer of both story and dialogue, so I think this is going to be great. The other issues will be drawn by Gene Ha and Nicola Scott. So, pretty much, it's a murderer's row of wonderful comic storytellers in this 3-issue series. Should be great.

November 23, 2021

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Science Fiction Double Feature: Catch It's November 24th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

Rob's Picks:

The History of Science Fiction by Xavier Dollo and Djibril Morrisette, published by Humanoids
It's no secret I'm a huge fan of speculative fiction generally. I grew up on it from my mother's love of all things sci fi/fantasy/horror, which led me quickly to Stephen King, Ray Bradbury, and so many others. Comics were a natural outgrowth of this, really. And of course, I'm married to my award-winning writer spouse (and periodic Panel Patter contributor) Erica Satifka. So I'm hugely excited to sit down and read The History of Science Fiction, a massive undertaking published by Humanoids. Looking to cover everything from Mary Shelley to the modern era, this is ambitious as hell--just like the best the genre has to offer. Naturally, there's a ton of text, but the illustrations are right there, too. The samples I've read so far show a varied artistic pallet (essential to any history project like this), with changes in style, coloring, and structure, while the words keep things moving in both dialogue bubbles and text boxes. I really dig the way they integrate the awesome visuals already present in sci fi literature, too. It's going to take me awhile to read this all the way through, but I can't wait. This is a perfect gift for the sci fi fan in your life--and then pick up a second copy for yourself, too.

November 17, 2021

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The True Grit of Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow, by Tom King, Bilquis Evely and Mat Lopes

Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow
Written by Tom King
Art by Bilquis Evely
Colors by Mat Lopes
Published by DC Comics

I read lots of good comic books, and sometimes read excellent comic books, but it’s only occasionally that I read something that I would really describe as being extraordinary or special. Well,  Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow (SWOT) is one of those special, extraordinary comics and possibly my favorite comic of all of 2021. It’s a thoughtful, heartbreaking, gut-wrenching, occasionally very funny comic, that’s brought to life with truly next level art and colors. This is some of my favorite work ever from writer Tom King (which is high praise because I love a lot of King’s work), and the combination of artist Bilquis Evely on art and Mat Lopes on colors is an absolute revelation. If you’re not reading this comic, you’re missing out on something really special.

As depicted in the below pages, our narrator for SWOT is Ruthye Marye Knoll. Her father has been murdered by a kingsagent named Krem of the Black Hills. Ruthye has left home in search of a bounty hunter she can hire  (with the sword that was used to kill her father as compensation) to exact revenge against Krem. The first one treats her with great disrespect (he takes the sword she was offering as compensation, and hits her), but he is stopped by another patron in the bar as he's leaving. Thankfully for Ruthye, and us, that patron is none other than Kara Zor-El, a/k/a Supergirl. Supergirl is on Ruthye's world because it's her 21st birthday, and she wanted to commemorate the occasion by getting drunk. Only, she can't do that on Earth since her powers prevent her from getting drunk. So, she made her way to Ruthye's world, which orbits a red sun. Even drunk and without her superpowers, Kara is formidable, and she makes easy work of the bounty hunter and gets Ruthye her sword back.


November 16, 2021

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Comics Apocalypse: Catch It's for November 17th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week..

Rob's Picks:
Radio Apocalypse #1 by Ram V, Anand RK, Anisha, and Aditya Bidikar, published by Vault
Bakerstown is one of the few communities left after a disaster turns the world to hell. A radio station gives some hope to the people there, all 94 of them, but it's not enough to overcome human nature--which often reverts to base instincts out of desperation. Both the good and the bad are on display in this first, admittedly bleak issue. This is a really dark comic, despite Anisha's bright colors, and not for those who want a sense of hope--at least, not yet. Ram V's dialogue and pacing are as sharp as ever while Anand RK's linework provides a vast, abstract canvas for the story to play out. With new residents on the way who've lost their own community, things are likely going to only get worse in a comic that's setting up to be excellent but definitely challenging to read.

November 10, 2021

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What's The Furthest Place From Here #1 by Matthew Rosenberg and Tyler Boss

What's The Furthest Place From Here #1
Written by Matthew Rosenberg
Illustrated by Tyler Boss
Color Assist and Design by Claire Dezutti
Letters By Hasson Otsmane-Elhaou
Published by Image Comics

What’s The Furthest Place From Here (WTFPFH) (from writer Matthew Rosenberg and artist Tyler Boss) is an excellent, stylish, detailed, very satisfying (oversized) debut issue. It does absolutely what I want from an issue #1, which is getting me really intrigued about the world and wanting to read more. But it does more than that. Issue #1 tells a satisfying story in its own right, in addition to building out the weird, post-apocalyptic world and making me care about the characters. It's Stand By Me meets The Warriors meets Empire Records, and it's an absolute must-read.

In the world of WTFPFH, it appears that society has collapsed. All of the adults have disappeared and all that is left is different groups of kids trying to survive. WTFPFH is focused on a group of kids that have taken refuge in and a building containing a record store. This record store is their home, and the fellow inhabitants are the closest and only thing they have as far as family is concerned. Their world is not one that exists without danger, as there is sometimes violence between different groups of kids. Different groups of kids seem to have taken on different thematic identities. There are kids in pig  masks and business suits and other themed gangs. By the end of the first issue, the kids have gone out searching for one of their number who is missing (or has been taken). In that way, it’s kind of a nice nod to the 1970s movie The Warriors (where a gang of teens has to make their way across New York City from one side to another confronted by one ridiculous gang or another with adults and law-enforcement and authority pretty much absent, as they try to make their way home to safety).

November 9, 2021

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Lemire the Merrier OR All's Well That's Cantwell: Catch it's for November 10th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

James' Picks:

She Could Fly vol. 3 TP by Christopher Cantwell and Martin Morazzo, published by Dark Horse

I've really liked the first 2 volumes of She Could Fly. It's a serious, sad story about mental illness and the difficulties of life. But it's also a story of conspiracies, big ideas, and dreams. I think this is the first comic work by Christopher Cantwell that I'd ever read, and it really made me want to pay attention to anything else he did in comics. Thus far his work has been great, and it'll be really interesting to see him revisit the first story that brought him to comics. Martin Morazzo is a fantastic artist, able to bring the weirdness of this story to life in an incredible way. He's a fantastic storyteller, with a unique, weird style.

Black Panther #1 by John Ridley and Juann Cabal, published by Marvel Comics

This is a brand new creative team, as Ta-Nehisi Coates concluded his run on Black Panther earlier on this year (the latter part of that run was with Daniel Acuna and I was a big fan). But this is a new creative team that I'm excited for. The story is being written by John Ridley, who is an Oscar-winning screenwriter (12 Years a Slave) but has also entered comics this year in a big way, with some Batman comics, and with The Other History of the DC Universe. I really enjoyed the latter book, as it is definitely on my shortlist for favorite comics of the year. It's a really big, ambitious project, which told the story of the DC universe but from the perspective of characters from underrepresented populations. Now he's taking his talents to Wakanda and I couldn't be happier. He's teaming up with Juann Cabal who is a fantastic superhero artist (I really enjoyed his work in X-23) and this is a great team and a promising new start.

Mazebook #3 by Jeff Lemire, published by Dark Horse

Jeff Lemire is one of my favorite creators in comics. He's certainly prolific as both writer and artist, and has created a ton of great work in multiple genres. But there are definitely themes that feel like they're important to him, to which he returns. Themes such as loss, trauma, mourning, and regret. He often does so on his written and drawn work, including in Mazebook. It's a sad story about a father, whose daughter died a number of years before. He thinks he is seeing clues left by her in different puzzles, and goes out to search for them and follow up on them. Is he imagining things? Is it just wishful thinking? Is some of it really happening? I'm not sure, and as with most of Lemire's work, the answers are often complex and not clear. But the journey is as important as the destination, so I'm glad to follow Lemire on this one. He just really gets the sense of emptiness and longing, and does a great job weaving in elements of the fantastical. I'd definitely recommend Mazebook for fans of his prior work, and for anyone who wants to get sad (in a good way) reading an excellent story.

Unbelievable Unteens: World of Black Hammer #4 by Jeff Lemire and Tyler Crook, published by Dark Horse

Speaking of great Jeff Lemire stories, I'm loving all of the various comics in the interconnected Black Hammer universe these days. Unbelievable Unteens is no exception. It's the story of an artist living in Spiral City who draws a teen superhero comic, only it turns out that the stories she is drawing are in fact real, and are based on the adventures that she and her fellow "Unteens" had years before (they're very melodramatic X-Men type stories). But the truth is coming out, and everything is going haywire. This series is a lot of fun, and artist Tyler Crook is (unsurprisingly) doing amazing work. His painted style really brings to life the dramatic, exciting story.

Rob's Picks:

Regarding the Matter of Oswald's Body by Christopher Cantwell, Luca Casalanguida, and Others, published by Boom! Studios
The tragic death of John F. Kennedy and then his assassin may never be truly resolved, depending on what information is still waiting to be declassified. It's perfect fodder for the vivid imagination of storytellers. In this new series, Cantwell and Casalanguida pick up one of the threads--the idea that maybe Oswald wasn't buried in his grave--and run with it in an entertaining and intriguing start. A group of talented minor criminals are gathered together by a man calling himself Frank, who has a friend named Jack. It's insinuated they'll be part of a cover-up, but right now it's just tantalizing clues. The mystery is well-developed by Cantwell does a great job in the Michael Walsh vein of illustration, reminding me a lot of the latter's X-Files work from a few years back. It's straightforward but extremely detailed, giving a good sense of the world. This one's going to live and die off the handling of the plot, but I trust Cantwell to have it well in hand and am extremely excited to see where this one goes.

Robin and Batman #1 by Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen, published by DC Comics
Normally, I'd roll my eyes at another Year One style story about anyone, especially someone in the Bat Family, but this is Lemire and Nguyen, so I'll make an exception. The awesome pair from Descender, a Dynamic Duo in their own right, take a look at what it was like for Dick Grayson to be Robin for the first time. Sure, we've seen this so many times before--from the original Kane written (or ghosted) stories to the excellent Chuck Dixon material to the versions on the big screen and television. But that's the thing about legends--there's more than one way to tell them. With one of the best (and most prolific) writers in comics paired with an amazing illustrator who can do everything from all-ages books to more mature work, this is going to be a great mini-series that should match up with the best stories about one of my favorite DC characters.

Edgar Allan Poe's Snifter of Death #2 by Dean Motter, Andy Troy, Holly Interlandi, Greg Scott, Lee Loughridge, Rob Steen, Rick Geary, and Others, published by Ahoy
Whatever the name on the cover, this series is always fun, as Ahoy's various stable of creators and some talented guests take some time to lovingly stretch Poe's work to its very limits. That's especially true of Interlandi's sharp approach to Angle of the Odd, in which she pulls the story into a variety of genres in the most comedic way possible, showing off her skills as a visual artist. (My favorite might be Poe as Shojo protagonist.) Dean Motter, meanwhile, goes after the essay Poe wrote about a supposed computer chess player of the early 19th Century, with a few nice jabs amid the historical fiction. It's great fun and I'm so glad to see the Poe cycle continuing strong.


The Thing #1 by Walter Mosley, Tom Reilly, and Others, published by Marvel Comics
Every so often, Marvel gives one of their best characters a solo series, letting a set of creators go wild with arguably the best character Jack Kirby ever co-created. This time around it's Mosley and Reilly, and while I know very little about it so far beyond the premise (Ben goes on a quest that sees him interact with a large swath of the Marvel U), I'm absolutely intrigued because of how much Mosley likes the lovable lump of orange rocks. There's a few samples out there of Reilly's look for the Thing, and I'm digging it. No idea how many issues this will run, but it sure looks like it's going to be my Thing, pun intended.

Mike's Pick: 
 

Fantastic Four # 1: Panel by Panel by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Chip Kidd, and Geoff Spear, published by Abrams Comicarts
It’s high time that one of the most important comics of all time gets a panel by panel annotation, and Chip Kids and Geoff Spear are a fantastic team to complement the seminal work by Kirby and Lee. Abrams is good at these kinds of books. They know how to package something like this. Part academic piece, part art book, this is something to put in a place of pride on the bookshelf.


November 3, 2021

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Friday, Book One: The First Day of Christmas by Ed Brubaker, Marcos Martin, and Muntsa Vicente

Friday, Book One: The First Day of Christmas TP
Written by Ed Brubaker
Art and Letters by Marcos Martin
Colors by Muntsa Vicente
Published by Image Comics (originally published digitally by Panel Syndicate)

Did you read Nancy DrewHardy Boys, or Encyclopedia Brown stories when you were a kid? I definitely did. They were so much fun. It was incredibly rewarding to try to figure out the mystery. But even more than that, I loved reading stories where kids were smart and capable and could figure things out for themselves. I loved the idea of kids my age going out there, taking risks, solving mysteries (particularly since I was a pretty risk-averse kid myself). But what happens when those kids grow up? A 12-year old running around solving mysteries seems cute and precocious; at 18 years old, it seems odd. And what if one of your dynamic duo of mystery-solvers wants to just grow up and do normal teenager things, and the other one doesn't? Well then, it could get pretty awkward.
 

November 2, 2021

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Reading Comics can make you a Human Target! Catch Its November 3rd, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

James' Picks:

Human Target #1 by Tom King and Greg Smallwood, published by DC Comics

I've been SO excited for this comic ever since it was announced. I'm a huge fan of almost everything that Tom King has written (I really enjoyed Strange Adventures and I am LOVING Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow). But I've gotta be honest, the real draw for me is artist Greg Smallwood. GREG. SMALLWOOD. Smallwood is an artist that does absolutely stunning work. I was such a huge fan of his work in the Moon Knight series he did with Jeff Lemire and Jordie Bellaire (read me going on and on about it here). He has a clean line, and immaculate character work, and his panel payout is incredibly interesting and innovative. You should also read his work in this Marvel series of stories. That Marvel series feels like it might have been something of the inspiration for the new Human Target series. I'll be honest, I don't know anything about the character of the Human Target. But, everything I've seen of this new series gives it this bright, stylish, sexy 60's spy vibe, which is more than enough to sell me on this series. This one is sure to be a delight.  

The Rush #1 by Si Spurrier, Nathan Gooden, Addison Duke, and Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou, published by Vault Comics

Vault has had some excellent horror series (like The Plot, Deep Roots, and Black Stars Above) and The Rush looks like it is going to continue in the tradition of those great books (links to all of my reviews above). Like Black Stars Above, this is a story of horror in the remote, 19th-century Canadian wilderness (which seems like a great horror setting and a ROUGH place to be). And I already know that I love the art in this first issue, having given it a read. It's gritty and detailed and grounded, but also weird and imaginative. The team of artist Nathan Gooden and color artist Addison Duke make for a fantastic combo. Duke uses some very washed-out, sepia-toned colors, and gives all the pages of the story a really fun weathered feel, so this definitely feels like an artifact from a long time ago. I loved this same art team earlier this year, in the Vault series Barbaric. So what I'm saying is, this book is great, Vault books are generally pretty great, and you are going to want to check this out.  

Newburn #1 by Chip Zdarsky, Jacob Phillips, Nadia Shammas, and Ziyed Yusuf Ayoub, published by Image Comics

I've read Newburn #1 and I can tell you it's an excellent comic. It's the story of a former New York police officer that now works as a private investigator on behalf of various mob families. He walks a delicate line, as he works closely with criminals, but also maintains his contacts and relationships with the NYPD. The first issue is fun and engaging, and creates a character that feels different than ones that I've seen in crime comics previously. But I'm not surprised, as it's from an excellent creative team. Chip Zdarsky has been on an amazing comics run. Note that long ago, I knew him as the hilarious illustrator of Sex Criminals, who, along with Matt Fraction, was just a really wild and crazy guy. But it turns out that Zdarsky is an incredible comic writer as well - he's written various Spider-Man comics have all been excellent, as has his Daredevil and independent books such as Stillwater.  And Jacob Phillips has been doing absolutely excellent work in That Texas Blood where he is both line and color artist. That's another crime comic (albeit one with a very different feel) that I would highly recommend. Anyway, Newburn is a strong debut and a lot of fun for anyone interested in genre crime or detective stories. 

Rob's Picks:
Lure by Lane Milburn, published by Fantagraphics
Science fiction stories have the power to shine lights on areas we'd otherwise prefer not to think about, especially when they increasingly cut closer to home. Milburn's Lure is a perfect example of this, taking the (probably? possibly?) fantastic idea of being able to live on other worlds and turning it into rich-person tourism, with artists serving at the pleasure of the highest of the upper classes. As the Earth continues to degrade, our protagonist finds out the corporate overlords are even worse than everyone expected--and that's when things get really bad. With stunning color contrasts, imaginative ideas for this speculative world, and soft lines that evoke Tillie Walden, Lure definitely, well, lured me into wanting a copy for myself. I'm betting there's quite a few of our readers who'll want to get a copy, too, because this is an awesome combination of science fiction, visual storytelling, and morality play.

The Haunt of Fear Volume 1 by Johnny Craig, Al Feldstein, Gardner Fox, Harvey Kurtzman, Harry Harrison, Wallace Wood, Graham Ingles, Jack Kamen, and Jack Davis, among others, published by Dark Horse (originally EC)
Oh, please like Halloween being over was going to stop my horror picks. Of all the genres right now going on within comics, horror is not just my personal favorite--I think it's where some of the best work is being done right now. But there's always time to go back to the classics, and the EC classics are some of the best. Dark Horse continues reprinting the original issues as created, with updated colors, this time turning to the Haunt of Fear--covering issues 15-17 and 4-6. (Yes, that's not a misprint--so much for "numbering used to be easier to follow in the old days!) While these stories vary in quality and of course are also written for a different time, whenever you can read work from Craig, David, and Wood all in the same book for about 20 bucks, you're in for a steal. I'm so happy these are now in affordable editions for all comics fans to enjoy!

Silver Coin #6 by Michael Walsh and Joshua Williamson, published by Image Comics
Typically, an anthology series with a recurring theme uses a narrator. Not so with Silver Coin, which continues into an ongoing series after the awesome mini-series wrapped up. The conceit here is a cursed coin, forged when a woman sold out her friend to avoid a puritan's wrath, continues to wreak havoc with whomever gets ahold of the coin. Working with awesome collaborators, creator Michael Walsh keeps the settings varied. For this first new issue, he and Williamson combine to find a kid who's tired of losing coins to his favorite fighting game. When he uses the Silver Coin, everything changes. A perfect mix of horror and a concept from my childhood. The first five issues of this series were extremely solid and I see no reason for that to change anytime soon. A nice twist on the one-person anthology idea that, along with Ice Cream Man and some other books, is showing Image isn't done being a horror provider of choice just yet.

Dark Knights of Steel #1 by Tom Taylor, Yasmine Putri, and Others, published by DC Comics
Not sure why DC doesn't call them Elseworlds anymore, which was an awesome name and branding, but here we have an alternative DC in which Superman's ship lands not in modern America, but in a Medieval time. The explosive change will have ripple effects in a universe set up by Taylor and Putri. I don't know much about this one beyond the premise but the art looks slick and very realistic, with a nice fantasy vibe that looks like it's going to work perfectly for the story. Plus with the cover teasing a literal Dark Knight, I can't wait to see what Taylor, Putri, and their collaborators have in store here.

Kelli's Pick:

The Waiting by Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, translated by Janet Hong, published by Drawn and Quarterly
The Waiting is the follow up novel to Keum Suk Gendry-Kim’s award winning graphic novel Grass. Just like Grass it is a heart wrenching, somber and important read. It tells the story of families torn apart by war, of people separated forever, never knowing the fate of sisters, brothers, children, and parents. The Waiting was inspired by the true story of Gendry-Kim’s mother who was separated from her older sister at the beginning of the Korean War. All of Gendry-Kim’s mother’s family made it out of North Korea, but her sister missed the last train out of Pyongyang. And just like that her sister became a ghost. Graphic novels like the Waiting should be required reading, for me it hit as deeply, if not more so than wartime classics such as The Wars, A Diary of Anne Frank, and Obasan. Just make sure you have a box of Kleenex near by.

October 28, 2021

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Halloween Horror: Rebellion's Monster Fun Special is Just That: Fun!


Monster Fun Special:
Written, Illustrated, and Lettered by Various Creators
Published by Rebellion/2000AD

Not going to lie--I was a little skeptical about this Monster Fun Special. The cover looked like the kind of gross-out all ages humor that honestly just isn't my thing. Well, there's definitely some of that going on inside, but there's also great slapstick, clever short-shorts, and even a nice set of Easter eggs in the opening story.

October 26, 2021

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Never open your comics! Catch It's for October 27th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week..

Kelli's Pick:

Never Open It: The Taboo Trilogy, art and words Ken Niimura, published by Yen Press
Niimura’s Never Open It was announced by Yen Press in April, I’ve been waiting like a kid on Christmas Eve for the release date and it is finally here. Niimura, who is based in Japan, has won a number of awards, including an Eisner for his work Umami and the Best International Manga award for I Kill Giants, a collaborative work with Joe Kelly. Niimura has a whimsical, lyrical art style which is well suited to his current work, which is a retelling of traditional Japanese folktales. His rendering in Never Open It kind of reminds me of Natsume Ono’s work [House of Five Leaves, Gente]. Folktales in any culture are usually cautionary and moralistic in nature. Niimura twists the retelling of three well known tales by posing the questions: Who decides what is right and what is wrong? Why is certain behaviour considered taboo, and who are the rules meant for? I’m digging the limited pallet of black, white, grey and red. The images on his website from the novel are stunning.

October 25, 2021

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Halloween Horror: Afterlift's Art Keeps It from Accelerating


Afterlift
Written by Chip Zdarsky
Art by Jason Loo and Paris Alleyne
Letters by Aditya Bidikar
Published by Comixology (Digital) and Dark Horse (Print)

A young woman who struggles with her own inner demons finds herself face to face with the real thing when she gets caught up in a race to control the soul of a recent suicide in a fast-paced adventure that has a lot of Zdarsky hallmarks, which isn't a bad thing.

October 21, 2021

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Halloween Horror: Everyone Should Love the All-Ages Ghoul Next Door


Created by Cullen Bunn and Cat Ferris
Letters by Aditya Bidikar
Published by Harper Collins
9780062896100

Grey lives in Ander's Landing, and it's haunted. At least Grey is pretty sure it's haunted. Turns out he's right, and soon finds he has a stalker of the supernatural kind. And while his phantom friend turns out to be a benevolent ghoul, their relationship is deadly dangerous for Grey. Before long, Grey's caught up in an underworld he never knew existed containing its own private horrors in an awesome collaboration from two creators I've been following for a long time, Cullen Bunn and Cat Ferris.

October 19, 2021

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Destroying Monsters is Engaging Work: Catch It's for October 20th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week..

James' Picks:

Catwoman: Lonely City #1 by Cliff Chiang, published by DC Comics

Cliff Chiang is one of those artists where I will check out literally anything he does. His work is that compelling and meaningful to me. Chiang has a gorgeous, distinct style that is incredibly accessible and inviting. The closest parallels I can think of is a slightly-more Manga influenced Fiona Staples (so, incredibly high praise). His work on Wonder Woman, and even more so on Paper Girls, was absolutely legendary. Not surprisingly then, I’m so excited for this series. It’s Cliff Chiang writing *and* drawing, which is all I need to know. The story is about Catwoman, and appears to involve an older Catwoman. What I’ve seen so far looks amazing, and I’m thrilled to see Chiang make his debut as a writer. He’s an incredible visual storyteller, so I have no doubt that this will be excellent. 

October 18, 2021

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Halloween Horror: Dai Dark is Gloriously Drawn, Over-the-Top Murderfest

Dai Dark Volume 1
by Q Hayashida
Published by Seven Seas

A young man is cursed to have special bones, but the bright side is that he can utilize powerful dark powers to keep people at bay who literally want to skin him alive and get to the treasure inside.

It's irreverent as all hell, completely over the top, and just a plain old murderfest.

Surprising absolutely no one, I loved it.

October 12, 2021

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Catch It's for October 13th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week..

 

Rob's Pick:
Marvel Meow by Nao Fuji, published by VIZ
No one cares that Captain Marvel's "cat" isn't really a cat, because the idea of it being a cat is so awesome. The idea inspired Fuji, who worked with Marvel to create a series of Instagram comics for their feed. They became such a big hit, he got to rework and expand them, and now Viz is putting them out for those of us who think reading comics on an ipad is bleeding edge technology. There are bits featuring Spidey (of course), Iron Man, Deadpool (read it anyway), and even Thanos and Galactus(!). I've only seen a few of these, but they're adorable as all hell, funny gag-strip work, and the heroes look really good--better than I expected, actually. (Not because of the artist, but because I was expecting more of a twee approach.)  these comics are sure to be a hit with the comics/cats Venn diagram, which is basically just two circles overtop each other, right? 

October 11, 2021

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Help Us Improve Panel Patter!

Hi Folks!

As the site moves into its 14th year, which I can hardly believe, it's time to ask our readers what we can do to maybe do the unheard of and go another 14 years or more!

You can take our survey here!

It's hard to keep anything going this long, let alone a site that's entirely volunteers. I am completely and utterly humbled by this, and I can't thank everyone who's ever helped keep the site going, year in and year out. Contributors, Creators, and Readers alike--you've all helped make this.

Thank you.

Now let's go be even better!!

-Rob




October 5, 2021

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Halloween Horror: Scary Stories at the Comic Shop for October 6th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week.. 

James' Picks:

The Swamp Thing #8 by Ram V, Mike Perkins, and Mike Spicer, published by DC Comics

I've really enjoyed this most recent Swamp Thing series. It's about a different person turning into the titular character (not Alex Holland); Ram V brings to this story the great mix of horror and colonialism and industry that he brought to These Savage Shores. And Mike Perkins does some of my favorite work I've seen from him, with wonderfully atmospheric colors from Mike Spicer. It's grounded but also weird and scary and unsettling. The Suicide Squad are involved now in the story as well, but this is still a story very focused on the new Swamp Thing (Levi Kamei), and his own life and legacy and the legacy of the character. It's great work.  

September 28, 2021

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Comics are an Adventure, man! Catch It's for September 29th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week..

James' Picks:

Adventureman #5 by Matt Fraction, Terry Dodson, Rachel Dodson, and Clayton Cowles, published by Image Comics

Adventureman is coming back! I love this series so much, it's just a pure delight of fun and wit and action and adventure. Before you pick up the new issue of Adventureman, you should go read the first volume. But before you do that, here's a little bit about the first volume (from my favorite comics of 2020):

"Adventureman is possibly the most purely fun comic I've read this year. It's written by Matt Fraction, illustrated by the Dodsons, and lettered by Clayton Cowles. So what I'm saying is, you're in incredibly capable hands with this book. What's great about this book is, well, pretty much everything. But more specifically, what's great about Adventureman is that it provides the reader with several different kinds of stories all in one. The story begins in an idealized, pulpy 1930's New York, as the city is under attack from evil invaders. But the police commissioner calls upon Adventureman and his band of science/mystical heroes to save the day. Adventureman is a classic barrel-chested, square-jawed Doc Savage type hero, and he and his allies do their best, and all appears lost...and then we realize that we've just been hearing about a story that a mom is reading with her son. It's present-day New York City, a much more mundane place. Adventureman is just a long-lost pulp-fiction character.  OR IS HE???  You'll just have to keep reading to find out. I promise you'll have a great time, and you will just want to pore over the incredible art from Terry and Rachel Dodson. Seriously - the characters, the city - it's all so gorgeous. This book is a real delight." 

September 21, 2021

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Impossible Jones is Impossibly Fun: Catch It's for September 22nd 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

Rob's Picks:

Impossible Jones #1 by Karl Kesel, David Hahn, Tony Avina, and Comicraft, published by Scout Comics
Sometimes heroes are born. Sometimes heroes are made. And sometimes heroes are just criminals hoping people won't notice among the heroic deeds. That's Impossible Jones, a "grin and gritty" book that long-time Panel Pal Karl Kesel and David Hahn came up with, and it's finally seeing a comic store release after a successful Kickstarter campaign. Per Karl, this is a bit of Harley Quinn (whom he used to write on a great run before they turned into mediocre female Deadpool for awhile), a bit of Plastic Man (as you'll see from her abilities), and a touch of Dick Tracy (well, you'll just have to see for yourself on that one). The story is fun and David Hahn and Tony Avina nail the art, capturing the wacky nature of things. Hahn's lines are perfect for the work, too, giving it a cartoony feel that doesn't take the exaggeration too far. Impossible Jones doesn't want to take itself seriously, but definitely delivers a seriously good comic!

September 14, 2021

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"Space is weird and terrifying!" and other themes: Catch It September 15th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...
 
James' Picks:
 
Canopus TP by Dave Chisholm, Published by Scout Comics
Canopus is a weird, beautiful poetic story, about loneliness, determination, and hope. I don't want to say too much about the details but it's an absolutely wonderful, slightly bizarre journey into space and memory. There's an astronaut marooned on a barren planet, alone except for her robot companion. She just wants to get back to Earth. And things get...strange. It's a compelling story, about finding things to believe in when that seems impossible. Chisholm is a fantastic storyteller in all aspects, and his animated, expressive, dramatic art tells the story beautifully. 

September 7, 2021

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Deadly DVD Machines, unhappy robots, the end of the world, and More! Catch It September 8th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

Deadbox #1 by Mark Russell, Ben Tiesma, Vladimir Popov, and Andworld Design, published by Vault Comics

If Mark Russell is writing a comic, I am *going* to check it out. He's got a great track record of writing fascinating comedic series full of sharp social satire. So, I'm excited for Deadbox because it seems like a change of pace. I'm sure it will be full of smart observations, but this seems like more of a horror story and I'm thrilled to see him play in that genre. The idea of a cursed DVD machine seems like a great one, and I'm thrilled to check this out. I'm not as familiar with Ben Tiesma's work, but what I've seen from him so far looks terrific. Providing vibrant colors to suit this eerie tale is the excellent Vladimir Popov, and letters are by the always great Andworld Design. 

August 31, 2021

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Get Outdoors! Camp with Girls and Groo! Catch Its for September 1st, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

Rob's Picks:

Groo Meets Tarzan #2 by Sergio Aragones, Mark Evanier, Thomas Yeates, Tom Luth, and Stan Sakai, published by Dark Horse
Our hero must fight off lions and snakes and rhinos just to survive! But enough about Sergio. Groo finds his way into Tarzan's world in his own inimitable way, getting ready to bravely (if obliviously) face off against the slavers that vex the Lord of the Jungle as this preposterous but unambiguously awesome story kicks into high gear. As I wrote about the first issue, Mark and Sergio are doing an amazing job of finding a way to make this all work, wrapped around a silly set of circumstances for the two creators. (I'm not sure who has it worse--Sergio trapped in a bargain basement Tiger King nightmare or Mark having to sit on so many Comic-Con panels!) Jokes aside, Evanier's script for the Tarzan section is really good, its seriousness just as solid as the silly "reality" sections and of course, Groo's desire for cheese dip. Aragones' linework is its typical detailed self, as is Yeates, though in a completely different fashion. Watching the two artists interact on the same page, as we start to see here, is going to be a real treat. I especially love how Luth ensures that the coloring purposefully highlights the differences, too. With 2021 starting to look like a different variant of bad, a comic like this is a lifeline of escape.

August 24, 2021

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Manga Noir? Yes Please! Catch Its for Aug 25th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

Rob's Picks:



Gamma Draconis by Benoist Simmat, Eldo Yoshimizu, Lauren Bowes, and Mark Bourbon-Crook, Published by Titan Comics
Comic book characters never learn, do they? Don't investigate the occult. It never, ever ends well. Lucky for us as the reader! Aiko Moriyama is an art student with an eye on the religious, but when she gets hooked into studying some occult work, things quickly spiral out of control. Soon she's replacing lecture halls and art galleries for secret talks and dark alleys as she's drawn into a web of intrigue. It's a fast-paced plot from Simmat (more on him from my colleague Kelli below) that keeps moving, aided by the artwork of Yoshimizu. My God, he draws the hell out of this graphic novel. The details are at the level of George Perez, which is about the highest complement I can give on background work. Even better, he's done an amazing job of varying the panels and packing them to the gills, all the while ensuring that the pages don't look either cramped or same-y. This is a great comic that should be on the radar of anyone who enjoys a good crime story in graphic form.

August 17, 2021

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Soaring with the clouds and the Kaiju: Catch It Aug 18th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

Kelli's Picks:

Go with the Clouds North by Northwest vol. 5 by Aki Irie published by Vertical [now Kodansha Books]
Aki Irie’s Go with the Clouds North by Northwest is part travel guide and love letter to Iceland and part mystery novel. Kei Miyama left Japan to live with his eccentric grandfather in Iceland. To stay occupied and make ends meet he works as a detective, taking simple jobs like finding stay dogs, tracking down runaways and lost lovers. Little does he know that his skills will be put to the test when his kid brother, Michitaka, is accused of murdering their aunt and uncle. Kei is also hiding a secret; he has a unique connection to and can communicate with mechanical objects. A useful ability to have as he continues to track down his illusive and increasingly violent brother. Meanwhile in Japan the police continue to dig into Michitaka’s troubled past. Slowly a portrait of a disturbed youth begins to build. Kei doesn’t believe for a moment that his brother is a killer, but can he continue to believe in his innocence as the evidence piles up? Go with the Clouds is not your conventional mystery story. I mean the main character communes with cars, cell phones and other electronics. His grandfather can communicate with and control birds and his kid brother can apparently kill people with his mind and a touch. The murder mystery is interspersed with tours of famous and not so famous spots in Iceland. Volume 5 sees Kei heading out to Laki, a mountain in the south of Iceland. He’s on a job, but he has Lilja, his love interest, in tow. They are like fire and ice so expect lots awkward flirting and the odd fight. Michitaka, meanwhile is making his way to Kei’s house, hoping to connect with his brother and assert his innocence.

August 15, 2021

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MICE is Back! Mini-MICE is coming, August 28 - 29, Central Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Are you going to be in the Boston area on August 28-29? If you are, then you should definitely go to Mini-Mice, the outdoor comics event taking place in Cambridge, Massachusetts that weekend. It's brought to you by the good folks behind MICE (the Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo), the absolutely fantastic event that's become a great local institution in the Boston comics scene. 

I've loved getting to go to MICE in prior years. There's always something for comic fans, young and old, new and long-time. This year's event will be a little different, as it will be entirely outside, and set up in a way that is COVID-safe for artists and guests. The event will be held outdoors and masks will be mandatory for all. There's a lineup of 64 artists, with different artists on Saturday and Sunday. So, you'll want to go on both days!  Erica Henderson, Karl Stevens, Kurt Ankeny, Colleen AF Venable, Andrew Maclean, and many more! This really looks like a wonderful (completely free!) event, and I recommend you go if you can. 

August 28 – 29, 2021 | Starlight Square | Cambridge 

12 – 4:30PM • 84 Bishop Allen Dr • Central Square • Cambridge, MA














August 14, 2021

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Ceci n’est pas​​ un lever de soleil - a look through Evan M. Cohen's Morning


“I woke up today to find my wandering mind searching for a moment that was left behind.”

Reading Evan M. Cohen’s Morning is a lot like watching a sunrise.  You see something dawning and the effects of that action ripple out of it.  It can be a life-altering experience to see the renewal of time happening right in front of you. Cohen’s storytelling, largely wordless, leads from one ripple into another, intersecting with other ripples to transform into something new. Maybe the act of just trying to recapture the feeling of a sunset in this comic is one of those ripples, one that blends with an actual sunset to give birth to this comic that’s far more a sensory story than a narrative one.  Cohen’s art is something to stare at, wash over you, and let it transform you even if it’s only for the time you spend reading this comic.

This comic envelops you, pulling you into it as you become an element of it.  On a very basic level, it’s about watching a sunrise.  It’s an ode to that daily event that happens whether we witness it or not. Cohen’s comic turns the event into transformative action. His artwork displays the breakdown and reconceptualization of an idea, of a person, of life as we know it on an almost daily basis.  A sunrise is not just a sunrise.  It’s a new beginning. It’s time and space full of infinite possibilities, all happening at once. The progression of time and space happens in small, incremental changes that welcome you while happening where you’re present or not.


Cohen sees time as a progression of smaller moments.  These moments contain even smaller, fractal-like moments as space becomes living, breathing, and organic. It’s constantly unfolding but always embracing. Each page contains a mystery and the answer to it while Cohen plunges deeper and deeper into the concept of a “sunrise.” This almost falls into the classic “Ceci n'est pas une pipe” territory but Cohen’s comic isn’t about a sunrise but the idea of sunrises. ​​A sunrise is a daily certainty that we have mapped down to the minute of its happening. Cohen uses that to express his feelings during the sunrise.  

Blue lines with color pencil-like red, orange, and yellow hues help suspend time and expand space in this comic. The cool night gives way to the warm day but that transition is largely balanced with neither set of colors dominating the image.  The blues are a base and the oranges rise out of the night, revealed by the sunrise. Creating this hazy moment that’s neither night nor day, Cohen uncovers this magical time outside of reality.  HIs panels flow one into the next, creating an animated sense of movement, color and light become our guide on this journey.  You have to read the images and follow this constant transformative propulsion only to have the images embrace and enfold you.




Cohen provides a Rorschach test of a comic.  The images aren’t abstract or random but there are probably as many interpretations of Morning as there are readers of it (which should be a lot.) With the constant dissolving and reforming of images, the optimism of the comic is almost overpowering.  We fall into, get absorbed, and then metamorphosed into something new only for the cycle to happen again over and over until the sun finally rises. The ability to recognize an obliteration of self while still retaining an individual consciousness makes this a fascinating reading experience.

Trying to describe Morning feels a lot like trying to read one of its pages, an exercise in giving a voice to something that doesn’t need a voice. The page exists; there’s a point where we should just let Cohen’s comic be. We should let it exist so that we can experience it, letting it do its work, to do its thing. It is not that Cohen’s work is inexplicable but in a lot of ways, it feels like it doesn’t need us.  It exists where we’re here to read it or not. It doesn’t need us but it’s a gift to be able to experience it.  A lot like a real sunrise, I guess.

August 10, 2021

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Dancing with the Devil in the Pale Moonlight - Catch It Aug 11th, 2021

Welcome to Catch it at the Comic Shop, where the Panel Patter team looks at what's coming out at your favorite store or digital device this week. Each one of us that participates picks up to five items due out this week, with a little bit about why we like them. (NOTE: We use solicitation material for this, so if we miss creators, please talk to your publisher!) Sometimes we might only have a few items to share, other weeks, keeping it to five will make for hard choices. Here's what the team wanted to highlight this week...

Mike's Picks

Batman '89 #1 by Sam Hamm, Joe Quinones, Leonardo Ito, and Clayton Cowles, published by DC Comics

August 6, 2021

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Maybe We're All Cat People-- a look at Karl Stevens' Penny: A Graphic Memoir


Some will tell you that a cat is the ultimate house animal, better than a dog, a guinea pig, or a goldfish combined.  Reading Karl Stevens’ book Penny: A Graphic Memoir, it’s hard to tell if those people are the sanest and most normal people around, seeing truths that the rest of us miss, or the most delusional people on this planet, fooled by the consummate trickster of the animal kingdom.  Spending her says high on catnip, wondering what cosmic mysteries exist on the other side of the door, and hoping that her humans don’t die just so they can continue to prepare her food, Penny is the grand, philosophical feline of her time, pondering the depths of existence while perched on top of her cat tower.  To get at this wonder, Stevens puts himself into the headspace of his cat, trying to see the world through her eyes. Along with his wife, Stevens himself appears in the book as supporting characters in Penny’s story.  That’s actually a good and fair representation of any person that shares their home with an animal; we’re there for them as much, if not more, than they’re there for us. And they know it.

Stevens’ watercolors tell Penny’s story through body language and facial expressions, something that’s hard enough to do with people but must be infinitely harder to show in a cat.  His realistic treatment of Penny and her home is made all the more mundane but in a spectacular way through his brush. His apartment becomes her domain, one that she lazily rules over.  Examining this world through Penny’s eyes, Stevens recenters our understanding of what life must be like for someone who believes the universe revolves around them.  Almost every page is constructed around Penny, giving us a much more narrow perspective than our own even though her perspective can be sitting on a windowsill, on the floor, or perched on a high shelf.  Stevens’ watercolors show us this world that’s so familiar but from angles that we’ve rarely seen before.


Each page is practically its own gag strip, with a setup and punchline delivered with skillful grace. In other hands, this would be a Garfield ripoff but Stevens finds a unique angle for these stories. Penny would be insufferable if she were a person, believing that the world needed to bend to her needs. We’d either feel sorry for or detest a person like Penny. Her interests are shallow; she doesn’t do much; she’s needy and lives almost only to be served. But in a cat? We coo at the animal, commenting on how cute it is, and accepting the general demeanor of the creature. Penny is inquisitive but cautious and generally lazy. Those are human qualities, words that describe human nature that one way or another we project on animals, including cats. Stevens locks in on this, turning a housecat into a mirror of us. This is Penny’s world and we’re just living in it.

What’s probably most shocking is the philosophical nature of this book, as Penny uses her days to question not just her existence but all of existence. She is a great questioner of why she’s here and what before she’s meant to do before usually just brushing off the question to accept the general meaningless of everything. It’s not that she’s nihilistic as much as she’s not too sure that the questions she’s asking are that important. Stevens uses her in this book to explore our purpose in this life before realizing that the answers to those questions won’t really change anything. She questions, she explores, and then she falls back into her regular ways, comfortable with the way things are.


That’s not to say that she never acts on her thoughts and desires.  For instance, she always watches her people go through the door and then come back hours or days later.  What’s on the other side, she constantly wonders until one day she’s able to slip through the door and into the outside world.  This housecat now becomes a stray and the world changes in ways that she’s not capable of adapting to.  She tries; she honestly does. But eventually, those journeys lead her back to the life she knew, little changed or wiser.  Stevens’ cat wants the world but when she gets it, realizes that it’s not all it was cracked up to be.

Penny: A Graphic Memoir sounds like a joke at first; life from the perspective of a cat.  It’s not like we don’t have enough comic strips and cartoons about that.  And even though it borrows a lot from the gag strip format, Stevens uses his character and her stories to show us how a lot of us go through our daily lives, wanting something more and then rejecting it when we get it.  Penny provides a wonderful perspective on this domesticated world, where we think we have everything but still feel empty inside.  Wisdom out of the mouth of cats.

Penny: A Graphic Memoir
Written and Drawn by Karl Stevens
Published by Chronicle Books